REC TRADE RESULT JULY 2017

Supreme Court allowed conditional trading of Non-solar RECs on July 14, 2017 (our blog on the same can be accessed here). Demand was expected to be low for two reasons – 1) obligated entities are required to pay at old RECs rate (Rs 1500/ REC); and 2) compliance is required to be done by March to obligated entities have enough time to comply even after the final order of Aptel is received.

However, demand for Non-solar RECs was robust. In total 4.95 lakh RECs were bought (110.76 % higher than July 2016), and clearing ratios on IEX and PXIL were 4.31% and 3.52% respectively. Higher demand was primarily driven by demand for some utilities where state regulators had given RPO enforcement orders in recent months.

Solar RECs were not traded as the stay imposed by the Supreme Court remains in force in the case of Solar RECs.

SUPREME COURT ALLOWS CONDITIONAL TRADING FOR NON SOLAR RECs

The matter of CERC’s order on new RECs pricing and the stay granted by the SC on trading, another  hearing was held in Supreme Court on 14th July 2017.

 

Main highlights of the Order:

 

  • An Intervention appeal was filed  requesting  obligated entities to purchase RECs at previous prices i.e. Rs 1500/ REC (MWH) with the additional amount deposited with the CERC

 

  • The Supreme Court allowed this, and directed that the differential price (Rs 500/REC) i.e. between the earlier floor price (Rs 1500/REC) and the present Floor Price(Rs 1000/REC) to be held by CERC during the pendency of the matter with Appellate Tribunal

 

  • Therefore, stay on the REC Trading (only for Non Solar RECs) have been withdrawn by Supreme Court and trade is likely to start. However, we believe that it will be some time before trading can start as CERC will have to develop modalities to accept such a deposit.

 

  • The stay on Solar RECs trading remains in place, and the hearing on that matter will be held  in due course

 

Today (17/July/17) the Appellate Tribunal was due to hear the above matter, but it has been postponed to a later date.

 

Implications of the SC order:

 

  • Trading will resume in the case of Non-solar RECs, but will remain suspended in the case of Solar RECs. However, we believe that it will be some time before trading can start as CERC will have to develop modalities to accept such a deposit.

 

  • Despite the start of trading, it is very unlikely that any meaningful demand for Non-solar RECs will materialise. Given the lack of any pressure to comply with RPOs, it is unlikely that any obligated entity will spend a higher amount while the matter is still sub-judice in the ApTel.

The SCs order can be accessed here

Our previous analysis of the order on stay of REC trading can be accessed here

 

An article, covering the order was published Business Standard. REConnect was quoted in the article suggesting that ““Trading will resume in the case of Non-solar RECs, but will remain suspended in the case of Solar RECs. However, we believe that it will be some time before trading can start as CERC will have to develop modalities to accept such a deposit”.

MP PROPOSES AMENDMENTS TO RPO REGULATIONS

The MPERC has released the Sixth amendment to Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy) (Revision-I) Regulations, 2010 [ARG-33(I)(vi) of 2017] on July 1st 2017. In these regulations, it has revised the RPO percentage which will be applicable to the obligated entities within the state of Madhya Pradesh. Comments are invited till 24th July. The graph below gives a comparison of the RPO percentages suggested as compared to the MoP trajectory.

 

The analysis of the previous amendment can be read here.

The regulation can be accessed here

 

SUPREME COURT ORDERS STAY ON REC TRADING

After the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission’s (CERC) order dated 30th March 2017 on reduction of prices for RECs, many REC-generating companies had filed petitions stating that they had incurred a loss as vintage multiplier was not provided. They had first gone to Appellate Tribunal of Electricity (APTEL) to suggest a way to clear the existing REC stock. While the APTEL agreed to introduce a vintage multiplier, it refused to put a stay on the trading.  When the petition was taken to the supreme court, it not only put a stay on the trading, it has also stayed the new price regime which was introduced by the CERC.

 

The Business Standard article covering the same can be accessed here.

Our blog covering the reduction in the REC prices and our analysis of the same can be accessed here.

ANDHRA PRADESH RELEASES RPO REGULATIONS FOR FY 2017:

The Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (APERC) has release RPO percentages for the years 2017-22. The RPO percentages have increased significantly since last year. In the year 2016-17, the RPO percentages were 2% for non-solar and 1% for solar. For the year 2017-18, the percentage has been increased to 6% and 3% for non-solar and solar respectively.

This percentage is applicable on total consumption of electricity including hydro and mini-hydel. The RPO percentages given in the regulation are as follows:

 

A comparison between the MoP trajectory and the percentages for this FY is given as follows:

 

The regulation can be accessed here.

KERC DETERMINES RETAIL TARIFF FOR STATE

Karnataka Electricity Regulatory Commission in its order dated 11th April, 2017, has approved the retail supply tariff for 2017-18. The tariff hike proposed by the KERC for industrial and commercial consumers and a comparison of the existing and the new tariff proposed by the commission can be seen as follows:

 

 

The table below represents the cross subsidy charges worked out as per the different consumer category:

 

The order can be accessed here.

REC TRADE RESULTS APRIL 2017

Being the first trade session of the financial year 2017-18, the April trade session was a robust one. Total Non-solar demand was 5.37 lakhs (vs 8.8 L demand in March), and clearing ratios on IEX and PXIL were 4.56% and 4.4% respectively.

Total solar demand was 2.08 lakhs, and the clearing ratio in IEX and PXIL were 2.53% and 8.76% respectively (March 2017 demand was 1.43 lakhs).

 

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 4.56% and 4.4% in both IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 2.53% and 8.76% in IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

HIMACHAL PRADESH ELECTRICITY REGULATORY COMMISSION (RENEWABLE POWER PURCHASE OBLIGATION AND ITS COMPLIANCE) REGULATION

HPERC has notified Renewable Purchase Obligation and its compliance, 3rd amendment 2017 on 24th March 2017.

 

Quantum of Renewable Power Purchase Obligation (RPPO)

 

Since Himachal Pradesh mostly thrives on the energy produced through Hydropower, the state will be a beneficiary since RPO is excluded from RPO obligation as per the regulation.

The graph below shows the total and type of energy consumption by the state of Himachal Pradesh. The data has been derived from CEA Report.

 

Almost 3/4th energy of the total consumption comes from the Hydro Power. Its an added advantage for the state that RPO is exempted from the power consumed through Hydro sources, thus this in turn will reduce the cost of power from the state.

The graph below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and HPERC’s earlier RPO Trajectory:

HPERC for computing Renewable purchase obligation for a year of obligated has included  the transmission and distribution losses within the state in the following manner:

  • In case the electricity is purchased by such obligated entity from sources outside state , the electricity at state periphery shall be considered as the consumption of obligated entity

  • In case the electricity is purchased or generated from generating sources located within the state the electricity injected at the generating bus bar shall be considered as its consumption

The above given clauses are against the law of Electricity Act 2003 as for computing renewable purchase obligation total consumption has to taken under consideration excluding the transmission and distribution losses.

The Supreme Court order on RPO dated 13th May 2015 has taken into consideration the word “ Total Consumption” which also has been used in Electricity Act 2003. One can find below the reference from the act Section 86 (e):

promote cogeneration and generation of electricity from renewable sources of energy by providing suitable measures for connectivity with the grid and sale of electricity to any person, and also specify, for purchase of electricity from such sources, a percentage of the total consumption of electricity in the area of a distribution licence;

 The regulation can be accessed here.

MPERC RELEASES TARIFF ORDER FOR LV, HV AND EHV CONSUMERS:

Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (MPERC) in its order dated 1st April 2016 has determined the tariff for Low Voltage (LV), High Voltage (HV) and Extra High Voltage (EHV). A summary of the tariff for HV3 consumers which includes Industrial, Non-industrial and Shopping Malls has been given in the table below:

The order can be accessed here

REC TRADE RESULTS MARCH 2017:

March trading results were far better than anticipated considering the recent CERC order on revised floor and forbearance prices. The March trade session remained a robust one. Total Non-solar demand was 8.88 lakhs (vs 10.4 L demand in February), and clearing ratios on IEX and PXIL were 6.11% and 9.6% respectively. For the full year FY 16-17, total RECs sold were 59.3 lakh as compared to 43 lakhs last year – an increase of almost 37.7%. This was the last trading session of FY 16-17.

 

Total solar demand was 1.43 lakhs, and the clearing ratio in IEX and PXIL were 2.90% and 2.74% respectively (Feb 2017 demand was 49,544). For the full year FY 16-17, total RECs sold were 5.5 lakh as compared to 6.4 lakhs last year – a decrease of almost 14.06%.

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 6.11% and 9.6% in both IEX and PXIL respectively.

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 2.90% and 2.74% in IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

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