ANALYSIS OF APTEL ORDER ON REC PRICING AND MULTIPLIER

Order in the case of REC pricing and vintage multiplier has now been uploaded on the ApTel’s website. Following is a quick summary of the same:
ApTel has rejected all prayers of the RE generators. Specifically, it has held:
-       Pricing: ApTel found no issues with the change in methodology by CERC when they used bid-discovered prices as against CERC determined generic tariffs.
The order states: “
“In view of the growing competition and induction of latest technologies, more and more generators are participating in the auctions/bids with considerable reduced cost of generation. Thus, the Central Commission in specifying REC prices, has shifted to bid discovered prices in place of earlier generic tariff fixed by it when the RE sector specially solar was in infancy stage.”
 
And
“We have carefully considered the contentions of all the parties and note that under the prevailing market scenario, the prices of RECs cannot be kept artificially high to burden the end consumers. Further, if the prices of RECs are kept high without aligning them with the market reality and current cost of electricity, the obligated entities may not purchase the RECs and try to fulfil their RPOs by other means.”
-       Vintage Multiplier – The ApTel has said that providing vintage multiplier is the “discretion” of CERC, and said that the CERC has provided “cogent reasoning” in its order, and further that the ApTel found “no unjustness in specifying the floor and forbearance prices of REC and discontinuation of the Vintage Multiplier”

-       In our opinion, the justification of price reduction is also to some extent based on factually incorrect premise. For example, the order says:
 
It is also noteworthy that sufficient time has been given to RE generators to sell their RECs at the power exchange but perhaps in anticipation of selling them at better prices has resulted into unsold REC inventory.”
 
            And further,
 
“Another important fact is that among the three routes available for RE generators, the REC capacity is dominated by RE generators operating under CGP and OA route rendering APPC route as the last choice”
 
We believe that this order will have a significant adverse impact on projects and investors that have invested in REC projects. An immediate impact will be that such project will have to bear heavy losses on the existing inventory of RECs – the losses will be particularly heavy for solar projects.
It also does not bode well for future investment in the REC mechanism, as falling RE prices are an irreversible trend. Does this mean that REC projects will have to bear losses of such reduction every year?

CERC Determines fees for issuance of Renewable Energy Certificates

In a recent amendment in the Regulation 11 of the REC Regulations, CERC determined the fees and charges payable by the eligible entities for participation in the scheme for, registration, eligibility of certificates, issuance of certificates, and other matters connected there with.  Following are some of the highlights of the regulation:

 

a)      Fees and charges other than those for issuance of certificates would be continued as they are at present until further orders.

 

b)      The fee for issuance of certificate for the period from 22.4.2013 till the date of issuance of next order by the Commission was determined at the rate of Rs 10/certificate.

 

c)      The fee for issuance of certificate for the period from 1.4.2015 till the date of issuance of next order by the Commission was to be regularized at the rate of Rs 4/certificate.

 

d)      The fees for issuance of certificate for the period from 1.1.2017 until further orders is determined to be Rs 2/- per certificate.

 

The regulation can be accessed here.

REC Trade result December 2016

This month trading saw good results with respect to the Non solar REC clearance overall. The demand for solar REC saw marginal improvement in respect to the last month. The total transaction value stood at 74.4 Crores in comparison to 53.6 Crores last month.

This month saw fall in the total issuance where the demand decreased by 4.60Lakhs in comparison to November. Though there had been significant increase in the total REC issuance due to the impact of CERC’s 4th amendment to RECs regulations.

Analysis of Trading:

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 3.19% and 2.81% in both IEX and PXIL, with a significant increase of 61% in the no. of REC’s traded as compared to last month

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 0.85% and 0.53% in IEX and PXIL respectively, with a dip of 23% in total demand of Solar RECs as compared to November.

 

 

 

REC Trade Result October 2016

Analysis of Trading:

 

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 1.9% and 2.06% in both IEX and PXIL, with a significant increase of 46% in the no. of REC’s traded as compared to last month

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 0.86 % and 1.16% in IEX and PXIL respectively, with an increase of 13% in total demand of Solar RECs as compared to last month.

This month trading saw significant improvement in the demand for both Solar and Non-Solar RECs as compared to last month. The total transaction value stood at 50.66 Crores in comparison to 37.5 Crores last month.

In contradictory to the total demand, this month saw a dip in the total REC issuance, where the demand increased by 1 lakh in comparison to September. This could be attributed due to the impact of CERC’s 4th amendment to RECs regulations.

 

Draft KERC (Procurement of Energy from Renewable Sources) Fourth Amendment, Regulations 2016

KERC has notified Fourth Amendment to KERC (Procurement of Energy from Renewable Resources) Regulations on October 26th, 2016. The draft of the proposed amendment is available in www.kerc.org. The highlights of the amendment are:

  1. RPO obligation is on captive plant, grid connected plants and open access consumers only .Hence non grid connected captive plants are free from RPO obligation in Karnataka state.
  2. Every distributions licensee, captive consumer and open access consumers may purchase REC or consume electricity generated from its own Renewable Energy Power Plant whether grid connected or otherwise, to meet its RPO either entirely or partly.
  3. The obligation of distribution licensees to purchase electricity from solar energy may be fulfilled by purchase of solar REC’s only.
  4. The capacity of Renewable Energy Power Plant owned by the obligated entity shall not be less than 250Kw.

KERC has invited written comments/views/suggestions on the proposed amendment latest by November 26th 2016 from interested parties.

Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy) (Revision-I)

Madhya Pradesh Electricity regulatory Commission (MPERC) recently ordered amendment for its Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy Regulation 2010.

The new amendment has defined the minimum quantum of electricity to be procured by all the Obligated Entities from Co-generation from Renewable Sources of electricity expressed as % of their total annual procurement of Electrical Energy.

The new amendment has excluded consumption met from hydro sources of power during the following Financial Years given as under:-

 

As the Ministry of Power (MoP) declared the national RPO trajectory recently, all the states are expected to declare their RPO trajectory soon.

The MPERC Draft can be accessed here.

REC Trade Result September 2016

The month of September trading saw significant decrease in the demand for both Solar and Non-Solar RECs as compared to last month. The total transaction value stood at 37.5 Crores in comparison to 52 Crores last month.

Analysis of Trading:

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 1.36% in both IEX and PXIL for Non Solar REC’s.  A total of 1, 75,525 RECs were traded this month as compared to 2, 58,891 RECs traded in last month, a decrease of 32%.

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 0.8 % and 0.98% in IEX and PXIL respectively, with significant decrease of 20% in total demand of Solar RECs as compared to last month.

 

 

 

In contradictory to the total demand, this month also huge rise in the total REC issuance where the issuance increased by more than 5 lakhs as compared to the past month’s total issuance. This could be attributed due to the impact of CERC’s 4th amendment to RECs regulations.

Analysis of Model Regulations on Forecasting and Scheduling of Wind and Solar Generating Stations at State Level

As you may be aware, CERC had notified forecasting and scheduling (F&S) regulation for inter-state sale of power a few months back. Now, with the intent of having compatible regulations, the Forum Of Regulators (FOR) has come up with model regulations. It is expected that states will adopt this model regulation or something on these lines in the near future.

Executive Summary:

  • Forecasting and scheduling will be required by all wind and solar project, regardless of the date of commissioning and capacity
  • Deviations will be calculated on the basis of total available capacity
  • Penalty is a fixed amount beyond the error range (10% in case of new projects, 15% in case of old projects)
  • Settlement will be done through the “Qualified Coordinating Agency” or QCA.

Detailed Analysis:

Forum of Regulators have recently come up with model regulation for forecasting and scheduling and deviation settlement mechanism. The primary objective is two fold: a) facilitate large-scale grid integration of solar and wind generating stations, and b) maintaining grid stability and security.

Highlights of the model regulation are below:

-          All solar and wind generators connected to State grid have to provide day-ahead and week-ahead schedule

-          Revisions can be made on a one-and-half hourly basis.

-          Payment for generation shall be as per actual generation (this is different from the inter-state regulation, where payment is on the basis of scheduled generation). .

-          The deviation slab has been narrowed for upcoming projects (i.e., +/-10%) but has been kept as (+/-)15% for existing generators at Intra-state level

-          Penalty is calculated at fixed amounts per unit (whereas, for Inter-state it is calculated as a percentage to PPA rate)

-          RPO accounting can continue as per existing arrangement, and needs no change.

Applicability of Regulations

All wind and solar generators connected to the State grid are covered:

  • regardless of date of commissioning,
  • including those connected via pooling stations
  • selling power within or outside the state.

Detailed Mechanism defined for Deviation Settlement

Deviation calculation both for Inter-state and Intra-state has been kept as :

*Available Capacity would ideally be the Installed Capacity, unless any of the turbines are on outage. Similarly for solar panels.

In case of Intra-State transmission, Penalty Mechanism for existing generators :

In case of Intra-State transmission, Penalty Mechanism for up-coming generators :

The detailed Regulation can be accessed here.

 

MPERC Amendment in RE Generation Regulation, 2010

Madhya Pradesh Electricity regulatory Commission (MPERC) on 10th September 2014 has ordered amendment for its Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy Regulation 2010. MPERC earlier invited the comments and suggestion and held a public hearing on 9th September 2014.

According to the new amendment the scheduling of Wind power plant with capacities of 10 MW and above and the solar power plants with capacities 5 MW and above shall be mandatory, whereas in principle regulation of 2010 this was missing.

On the other hand, MPERC had proposed 3nd amendment to MPERC (Cogeneration and generation of electricity from renewable sources of energy) Regulations, 2010, in which it wanted to include energy generated from fossil fuel based Co-generation plant under RPO compliance, and exclude such energy generated from availing REC’s. After hearing various stakeholders, MPERC finally decided to drop this amendment with regard to Co-generation, and approved the afore mentioned amendment regarding scheduling of RE power.

Earlier CERC in its order on 06th January 2014(Refer), suspended the RRF mechanism but directed the RE Generators to continue the scheduling and forecasting according to the previous regulation.

The MPERC Draft can be accessed here.

Contributed by Dheeraj Babariya.

Forum of Regulators discusses Issues of RRF

The 41st meeting of Forum of Regulators held on 27th June 2014 at Delhi. A presentation on the issue “Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Sources” was made by Mr. S.K. Soonee (CEO, POSOCO/NLDC). The mandatory requirement of Forecasting and Scheduling was also been emphasized by regulators present in the meeting.

The key insights related to RRF (Renewable Regulatory Fund) are highlighted below:

  • Forum suggested that the RRF should be put in place to ensure grid discipline.
  • MNRE stressed that when commercial mechanism is suspended, the reaming issues including stabilizing the RRF mechanism, should be taken up on priority.
  • It was emphasized that besides Gujarat, installation of ABT meters has to be implemented in all other wind rich states before the commencement of RRF operations.
  • Emphasis was laid on the need of flexible generation, Forecasting and Scheduling of variable Renewable Energy, and developing Renewable Energy Management Centres (REMC’s).
  • The plan of developing Green Energy Corridors for strengthening RE evacuation and Grid stability was also discussed.
  • It was shown that the change in wind generation is having a negligible effect on deviation from schedule.

It can be inferred from the insights of the meeting that the Regulators are keen to bring the RRF mechanism in force (to ensure gird security) but before that, the Regulators are keen on ensuring that all key hurdles are cleared. Also Regulators have shown their positive response towards Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Sources.

 More information can be accessed here

 Contributed by Dheeraj Babariya.

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