Uttarakhand Electricity Regulatory Commission (Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance)

The Ministry of Power (MoP) had recently declared the national RPO trajectory.  The order had enlisted the yearly RPO trajectory for both non-solar and solar power purchase from 2016-17 till 2018-19. Following the steps of MoP RPO trajectory and other states Uttarakhand has also notified its amendment to the Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance, regulations.

The regulation will be applicable to:

  • The distribution licensee
  •  Or any person, consuming electricity procured from conventional sources through open access third party sale,
  • Or person who installs Captive Generating Plant, with an installed capacity exceeding 5 MVA, requirements also.

The table below shows the Minimum Quantum of Purchase in percentage (%) from renewable sources (in terms of energy in kWh) of total consumption:

The said obligations will be applicable on total consumption of electricity by an obligated entity, excluding consumption met from hydro electric sources of power.

Analysis:

  • RPO to be applied on co-generation power
  •  Consumption from hydro sources to be excluded
  • RPO % is proposed to increase steeply – from 11.50% in 2016-17 to 14.25% in 2017-18 line with the MoP Trajectory. However, in effect the overall RPO of the UK will fall as 70% of the power consumed in the state comes from hydro sources.
  • In year 2013, UERC had come up with a five year long RPO Trajectory ranging from 6.05% (including both solar & non solar) in 2013-14 to 10.50% in 2017-18. The commission now proposes to increase its RPO target in comparison to its earlier trajectory, though the commission has not defined the RPO% FOR 2018-19 unlike other states. The graph given below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and UERC’s earlier RPO Trajectory.

Since Uttarakhand mostly thrives on the energy produced through Hydro Power, the state could be a beneficiary since RPO is excluded from RPO obligation as per the regulation.

The graph below shows the total and type of energy consumption by the state of Uttarakhand. The data has been derived from CEA Report.

Joint Electricity Regulatory Commission (Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance)

The Joint Electricity Regulatory Commission (Goa and UT’s) recently came up with its long term Renewable purchase obligation trajectory and compliance regulation, following the footsteps of states like Chhattisgarh, HP and AP. JERC has declared its RPO Trajectory up to 2022 with total RPO of 17% which lags behind in comparison with MoP RPO Trajectory and of other states.

Just like other states, the said obligations will be applicable on total consumption of electricity by an obligated entity, excluding consumption met from hydro electric sources of power. The graph below gives comparison of MoP RPO Trajectory with JERC RPO Trajectory:

 

The JERC Regulation can be accessed here.

 

 

 

Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance)

The Ministry of Power (MoP) had recently declared the national RPO trajectory.  The order had enlisted the yearly RPO trajectory for both non-solar and solar power purchase from 2016-17 till 2018-19. Following the steps of MoP RPO trajectory, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh and now Andhra Pradesh has notified its Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance, regulations which will be effective from April 17, 2017.

The regulation will be applicable to:

  • The distribution licensee
  •  Or any person, consuming electricity procured from conventional sources through open access third party sale,
  • Every consumer owning a captive generating plant of installed capacity 1 MW and above and synchronized with the Grid.

 

The table below shows the Minimum Quantum of Purchase in percentage (%) from renewable sources (in terms of energy in kWh) of total consumption:

 

The said obligations will be applicable on total consumption of electricity by an obligated entity, excluding consumption met from hydro electric sources of power.

 

Analysis:

  • RPO to be applied on co-generation power
  • The distribution licensees shall compulsorily procure 100% power produced from all the Waste-to-Energy plants in the State, in the ratio of their procurement of power from all sources.
  • The Consumption from hydro sources to be excluded
  • RPO % is proposed to increase steeply – from 11.50% in 2016-17 to 17% in 2018-19 line with the MoP Trajectory.
  • The graph given below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and APERC’s RPO Trajectory

The regulation can be accessed here

Himachal Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance) Regulations

The Ministry of Power (MoP) had recently declared the national RPO trajectory.  The order had enlisted the yearly RPO trajectory for both non-solar and solar power purchase from 2016-17 till 2018-19. Following the steps of MoP RPO trajectory, Chhattisgarh and now Himachal Pradesh have notified its third amendment to the Renewable Power Purchase Obligation and its Compliance, regulations.

The regulation will be applicable to:

  • The distribution licensee
  •  Or any person, consuming electricity procured from conventional sources through open access third party sale,
  • Or person who installs Captive Generating Plant, with an installed capacity exceeding 5 MVA, requirements also.

The table below shows the Minimum Quantum of Purchase in percentage (%) from renewable sources (in terms of energy in kWh) of total consumption:

The said obligations will be applicable on total consumption of electricity by an obligated entity, excluding consumption met from hydro electric sources of power.

Analysis:

  • RPO to be applied on co-generation power
  •  Consumption from hydro sources to be excluded
  • RPO % is proposed to increase steeply – from 11.50% in 2016-17 to 17% in 2018-19 line with the MoP Trajectory. However, in effect the overall RPO of the HP will fall as 77% of the power consumed in the state comes from hydro sources.
  • In year 2011, HPERC had come up with a ten year long RPO Trajectory ranging from 10% (including both solar & non solar) in 2011-12 to 19% in 2021- 22. The commission now proposes to increase its RPO target in comparison to its earlier trajectory. However, in 2016-17, RPO % is will be reduced. The graph given below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and HPERC’s earlier RPO Trajectory

The graph given below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and HPERC’s earlier RPO Trajectory:

 

As the graph indicates HPERC has increased its RPO target by 2.25% to be achieved by 2018-19. Since Himachal Pradesh mostly thrives on the energy produced through Hydro Power, the state could be a beneficiary since RPO is excluded from RPO obligation as per the regulation.

The graph below shows the total and type of energy consumption by the state of Himachal Pradesh. The data has been derived from CEA Report.

 

Almost 3/4th energy of the total consumption comes from the Hydro Power. Its an added advantage for the state that RPO is exempted from the power consumed through Hydro sources, thus this in turn will reduce the cost of power from the state.

The regulation can be accessed here.

The CEA Report could be accessed here

 

Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy) (Revision-I)

Madhya Pradesh Electricity regulatory Commission (MPERC) recently ordered amendment for its Cogeneration and Generation of Electricity from Renewable Sources of Energy Regulation 2010.

The new amendment has defined the minimum quantum of electricity to be procured by all the Obligated Entities from Co-generation from Renewable Sources of electricity expressed as % of their total annual procurement of Electrical Energy.

The new amendment has excluded consumption met from hydro sources of power during the following Financial Years given as under:-

 

As the Ministry of Power (MoP) declared the national RPO trajectory recently, all the states are expected to declare their RPO trajectory soon.

The MPERC Draft can be accessed here.

REC Trade Result September 2016

The month of September trading saw significant decrease in the demand for both Solar and Non-Solar RECs as compared to last month. The total transaction value stood at 37.5 Crores in comparison to 52 Crores last month.

Analysis of Trading:

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 1.36% in both IEX and PXIL for Non Solar REC’s.  A total of 1, 75,525 RECs were traded this month as compared to 2, 58,891 RECs traded in last month, a decrease of 32%.

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 0.8 % and 0.98% in IEX and PXIL respectively, with significant decrease of 20% in total demand of Solar RECs as compared to last month.

 

 

 

In contradictory to the total demand, this month also huge rise in the total REC issuance where the issuance increased by more than 5 lakhs as compared to the past month’s total issuance. This could be attributed due to the impact of CERC’s 4th amendment to RECs regulations.

REC Trade Result August 2016

This month trading saw marginal increase in the demand for both Solar and Non-Solar RECs as compared to last month. Compared to August 2015, demand was almost double this month.  The total transaction value stood at 52 Crores in comparison to 40 Crores last month.

This month also saw significant fall in the total REC issuance with 40% reduction as compared to the past month’s total issuance. However, this is likely to be a temporary blip as RECs issuances are yet to catch up after the impact of CERC’s 4th amendment to RECs regulations.

 

Analysis of Trading:

 

Non Solar – Clearing ratio in exchange stood at 1.86% and 2.27%in IEX and PXIL respectively for Non Solar REC’s.  A total of 2, 58,891 RECs were traded as compared to 2, 35,007 RECs traded in July, an increase of 10%.

 

 

Solar – Clearing ratio stood good at 0.99% and 1.4% in IEX and PXIL respectively, with a marginal increase of 5% in total demand of Solar RECs as compared to last month.

CSERC Determination of Generic Tariff for Renewable Energy for FY 2015-16

The Chhattisgarh Electricity Regulatory Commission came up with its final order on the CSERC (Terms and Conditions for Determination of Renewable Energy (RE) Tariff) Regulations, 2015, (“the RE Tariff Regulations”) on 1st May, 2016. The RE Tariff Regulations specify the Terms and Conditions and the Procedure for determination of Generic Tariff by the Commission. Central Commission has specified capital cost as Rs.619.16 Lakh/MW for wind energy projects for the year 2015-16.The graph below gives a comparison of the RE tariff determined in year 2013-14, 2014-15 to 2015-16 for wind generators.

In the Draft Generic Tariff Order, the normative Capital Cost for the Solar PV power projects for was not declared by CERC and accordingly, the Commission proposed to consider the same Capital Cost of Rs. 605.85 lakh/MW for the Solar PV Projects and Rs. 1200 lakh/MW for Solar Thermal Projects to be commissioned in the period from 1 April, 2015 to 31 March, 2016.

The graph below gives comparison of Generic Tariffs for Solar Projects in the period from 2015– 2016 to the previous years. The tariff has been determined depending on the type of solar project as follows:

The Order can be accessed here.

Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission Amendment to RPO Regulation, 2010

The Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission recently came up with new amendment in the Renewable Purchase Obligation, 2010. The amendment was made in the regulation 3 after sub regulation (1) regarding the RPO percentages as mentioned below

The Commission orders that the Renewable Purchase Obligation specified for 2011-2012 in the sub regulation (1) shall be applicable for the years 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 to all the distribution licensees.

 

The Order can be accessed here.

MNRE Issues Notice on RPO compliance

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy in collaboration with Government of India has made a great initiative by spreading the message about RPO and the need for its compliance through Times of India.  The Government highlights that all the obligated entities must comply with their RPO by March 15-16 since this trading session will be the last trading session of the compliance year, whose result calls for stricter enforcement by states. The Times of India’s article can be viewwd below

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