KERC announces a revised tariff order for rooftop solar plants for domestic consumers

KERC has recently announced an order for the “revision of tariff in respect of new Solar Rooftop Photovoltaic Units of 1kW to 10kW capacity installed by domestic consumers”. The government of Karnataka has set a target of 2400 MW of grid-connected rooftop generation projects under its solar policy 2014-2021. As of August 2018, Karnataka’s installed capacity for both ground-mounted and rooftop solar capacity is 5179 MW. Out of the total installed capacity, only 145 MW is solar rooftop photovoltaic plants (SRTPV) units have been installed & commissioned. Karnataka Electricity Regulatory Commission (KERC) the Commission had issued a Discussion Paper in the matter of revision of tariff in respect of new Solar Rooftop Photovoltaic Units of 1kW to 10kW capacity installed by domestic consumers, on 09.09.2018, inviting comments/suggestions from the stakeholders.

One of the reasons for the poor response for installation of rooftop solar photovoltaic plants by the domestic consumers may be the low Feed-In Tariff (FIT) fixed by the Commission as compared to the relatively higher capital cost of smaller capacity SRTPV units. Hence, the Commission was of the considered view that there is a need to promote smaller capacity solar rooftop power plants by the domestic consumers in order to achieve the desired capacity addition of SRTPV plants in the State.

Post the comments and suggestions, the commission has made some changes as below:

  • The CUF is retained to be 19% % even for 1 kW to 10 kW capacity SRTPV Plants from the 16% CUF earlier.
  • The capital cost for SRPTV plants of 1 kW to 10 kW is decided to be INR 48,000/kW.
  • The generic tariff for grid-connected new Solar Rooftop Photovoltaic Units of 1kW to 10kW capacity installed by domestic consumers at INR.4.15 only per unit (without capital subsidy) and at INR.3.08 only per unit (with capital subsidy).
  • The above-mentioned changes will be applicable to new plants with commissioning date on or after 19.12.2018.

SECI to come up with 750 MW capacity solar power projects in Rajasthan

SECI has announced an RfS for setting up of 750 MW grid-connected solar photovoltaic power projects in Rajasthan. The land, connectivity & long-term open access shall be the scope of the developer. The tender is a “Build-Own-Operate” (BOO) basis where SECI will enter into a Power Purchase Agreement with the successful bidders for a period of 25 years. The power produced through the project is decided to be sold to Rajasthan Urja Vikas Nigam Limited (RUVNL). The summary of the RfS is as below:

 

Document

Charges

RfS document
  • INR 29,500/- (Indian Rupees Twenty-Nine Thousand Five Hundred Only) including GST
Processing fee
  • Rs. 3 Lakh +18% GST for each Project from 10 MW up to 40 MW capacity
  • Rs. 5 Lakh + 18% GST for each Project from 50 MW up to 90 MW capacity
  • Rs. 10 Lakh + 18% GST for each Project from 100 MW and above capacity
Total available capacity 750 MW
Minimum capacity Minimum individual capacities of 10 MW, and shall be set up in multiples of 10 MW.
Commissioning period
  • For project capacity (1-240 MW): Scheduled Commissioning Date (SCD) shall be the date as on 21 months from the effective date of the PPA
  • For project capacity (250 MW and above): the SCD for the Project shall be the date as on 24 months of the effective date of the PPA
Processing fee
  • Rs. 3 Lakh +18% GST for each Project from 10 MW up to 40 MW capacity
  • Rs. 5 Lakh + 18% GST for each Project from 50 MW up to 90 MW capacity
  • Rs. 10 Lakh + 18% GST for each Project from 100 MW and above capacity
Earnest Money deposit Amount: INR 10,00,000/- (Indian Rupees Ten Lacs) per MW per Project to be submitted in the form of Bank Guarantee along with the Response to RfS
Performance Bank Guarantee (PBG) Bidders selected by SECI based on this RfS shall submit Performance Guarantee for a value @ INR 20 Lakh/ MW within 30 days of issuance of Letter of Intent (LoI) or before signing of PPA, whichever is earlier.
Ceiling tariff INR 2.93/ kWh for 25 years.

SECI has issued this RfS in line with the Ministry of Power (MoP) issued “Guidelines for Tariff Based Competitive Bidding Process for Procurement of Power from Grid Connected Solar PV Power Projects” since August 2017.

INR 2.67/unit tariff discovered for hybrid wind-solar 1.2 GW tender

The maiden tender for ISTS-connected hybrid wind-solar projects discovered an L1 tariff of INR 2.67/unit recently. The tender postponed six times in the past, due to lack of interest and the capacity was also reduced to 1.2 GW from 1.5 GW previously. The recent tender attracted two bidders who successfully bid for the hybrid projects:

These were the only two firms to participate in the Solar Energy Corporation of India’s (SECI) tender for 1,200 MW of wind-solar hybrid units. The two companies had offered 1,050 MW capacity in total. Due to several issues surfacing in the first tender of its kind, the last date for bid submission had been postponed six times.

The tender saw such a low response due to the low ceiling tariff for the tender. Initially, the ceiling tariff was fixed at INR 2.90/unit but was later reduced to INR 2.60/unit post directions from Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE). Currently, the market derived tariff for solar found in India is `2.42/unit and for wind energy, the lowest price discovered is Rs 2.43/unit.

The hybrid policy was launched in May,  with an objective to provide a framework for promoting large grid-connected wind and solar PV hybrid system for efficient utilization of transmission infrastructure and land. Along with this, it aims to help reduce the inconsistency in the renewable power generation and in turn achieve better grid stability.

India to introduce a cap on solar tariff and reduces tender size for manufacturing unit

In a major development, the MNRE has directed the Solar Energy Corporation of India(SECI) to fix the upper permissible solar tariff at INR 2.50/kWh and INR 2.68/kWh for developers using domestic cells & modules (without safeguard duties) and imported products (with safeguard duties), respectively. SECI has reduced its solar manufacturing tender size from 5 GW to 3 GW and curtailed minimum bid capacity from 1 GW to 600 MW. However, the size of the PPA remains the same at 10 GW. This comes to post an announcement by the Power  Minister – that all the future renewable energy projects bid would have to cover at least a 50% of a project’s components with domestic manufacturing. Regarding the PPA, it must be executed within a maximum time frame of 90 days from the date of award and a minimum of 40% of commissioned within 21 months from the date of PPA signing. The remaining 60% of the capacity will have to be commissioned within 36 months from the date of the bid award letter. SECI has also revised the time allowed to set up manufacturing capacity to two years from the earlier three-year time period.

  • For silicon-based facilities, the module manufacturing unit has to be set up in India whereas polysilicon can be imported.
  • For non-silicon-based technologies, the primary functional raw material can be imported.

To support this development SECI has announced a 5 MW solar manufacturing tender linked to a 10 GW PPA, also in June. It was the first solar tender where developers were required to locally produce equipment in order to win projects.

Lowest ever tariff of Rs.1.58 discovered at RESCO model tender in Madhya Pradesh

The latest tariff discovered for rooftop solar at Power Grid Corporation in Madhya Pradesh is INR 1.58 kWh/unit. This is the lowest tariff discovered so far in the country. AMPSOLAR, a New-Delhi based company bid for the lowest tariff for putting rooftop solar plants on the 10 government buildings. The highest tariff of INR 4.3 kWh/unit was by Renew solar for a private company. The tender auctioned under the RESCO model attracted 31 international as well as domestic developers who oversubscribed the 35 MWp tender capacity by 630%. The project will get a subsidy from MNRE of 20% and 25% from the state government.

In a RESCO model, the Bidders intend to use a Premise owned/used by the Procurer and enters into the PPA with Procurer for the supply of solar power as per RFP.

List of bidders and tariff is as below:

Establishments Tariff  (KwH/unit)
Municipal buildings Rs 1.69
Medical colleges Rs 1.74
Police establishments Rs 2.33
Government engineering colleges, ITIs, and polytechnics Rs 2.35
private institutions Rs 2.28

“The solar rooftop sector has been struggling with issues like the significant upfront cost for individual consumers and lack of enabling the framework for Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to develop a scalable business model. The bid results for 35 MWp Solar Rooftop tender are testimony to numerous policy, contractual and procedural innovations deployed in the RESCO programme to find solutions to these gaps,” said Manu Srivastava, principal secretary, renewable energy, in the Madhya Pradesh government.

Read the corrigendum document and detail list of bidders here.

MERC announces generic tariff for various RE sources

Recently the Maharashtra Electricity Regulatory Commission (MERC) announced an order for generic tariff determination of various renewable resources including Solar and Wind. Even after the generic tariff is realized, DISCOMs opt for competitive bidding for tariffs due to the low rates. The details regarding the tariffs for various RE sources is a follows:

Renewable energy sources

Tariff without AD Tariff with AD
Non-Fossil Fuel-Based Cogeneration Projects INR 4.99 _
Biomass projects INR 7.30 INR 7.44
SHP (5 MW-25 MW) INR 3.66 INR 3.92
SHP (1 MW-5 MW) INR 4.36 INR 4.64
SHP (500 kW-1 MW) INR 4.86 INR 5.14
SHP 500 kW and less INR 5.36 INR 5.64
Wind Energy projects INR 2.87
Utility-Scale Solar PV Projects INR 2.72

Rooftop Solar PV projects INR 3.22

The above mentioned solar rooftop tariff will be applicable from August 1 2018 to March 31 2019 and for wind projects between August 1 2018 – March 31 2019 for  a period of 13 years from the date of commissioning. However, in a recent project auction base tariff of INR 2.52/kWh was discovered (INR 0.35/kWh less than the new generic tariff).

In case of SHP, the above-mentioned tariffs will be applicable between August 1, 2018, and March 31, 2019, for 35 years (with capacity up to 5 KW) and 13 years for SHP with a capacity greater than 5 MW and up to 25 MW.

Recently Maharashtra also announced its final regulations for the forecasting, scheduling and deviation management regulations in July 2018.

HPERC DETERMINES GENERIC LEVELLISED TARIFF FOR SOLAR PV PROJECTS

Himachal Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (HPERC) has determined the regulations for determination of generic levelised tariff for solar PV projects. The tariff has been determined in parts.

 

  • Tariff determined for the Solar PV projects applicable from 01.04.2017 to 30.09.2017 is as follows:

The capital cost has been determined at Rs 446 lakh/ MW and the tariff determined is:

 
  • Tariff determined for the Solar PV projects applicable from 01.10.2017 to 31.03.2017 is as follows:

The capital cost considered for solar projects is 446 Lakh/ MW for projects above 1 MW to 5 MW and 452.70 lakh/ MW for projects over 1 MW capacity. The tariff determined is as follows:

In comparison to the tariff of previous years, there has been a steady decrease of 17%. The following graph shall make this clearer:
 
The order can be accessed here.

SUBSIDIES IN THE RE SECTOR

Encouraging RE installation in the state, till now, the country’s policies have provided various benefits in the form of subsidies, generation based incentives, viability gap funding, etc.As the installed capacity of solar and wind energy has been increasing consistently, the government has consistently decreased the incentives to renewable energy.

Now that the prices of electricity generated from renewable energy has come very close to the price of electricity generated through fossil fuel based sources, almost achieving grid parity, the government is considering removal of subsidies and incentives given to installation and generation from renewable energy. This change may take place in the coming financial year, as per experts. This development has been reported by the Economic Times.

The wind tariff recently dropped down to Rs 2.43 per unit in an auction held by GUVNL in the month of December 2017 and solar tariff dropped down to Rs 2.65 per unit in September.

GUVNL’S BIDDING FETCHES TARIFF OF Rs 2.65

In a bidding which took place on 19th September 2017 for a 500 MW solar plant of Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd. (GUVNL), the lowest price determined was Rs 2.65 per unit. This was slightly higher than the price of Rs 2.44 determined in the last reverse bidding by SECI. This increase in the price determined was attributed to the implementation of GST and the increase in the cost of solar panels being imported from China.

A continuous decreasing trend has been seen in the tariff determined for solar projects in the Country this year. The following graph determines the trend in prices of solar power determined in the past:

The article can be accessed here.

STATES IN INDIA BARRED FROM CANCELLING PPAS

The Government has barred the states in India from arbitrarily cancelling PPAs and has also imposed a penalty of 50% of the tariff. This notification has come after six states in the last two months have cancelled or renegotiated PPAs signed at higher prices. This is a welcoming move as it will make sure that the renewable energy sector keeps growing and the government is able to install 175 GW renewable energy by 2022.

 

The article covering the same can be accessed here

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