MOP DETERMINES GUIDELINES FOR FOR COMPETITIVE BIDDING FOR POWER PROCUREMENT FROM SOLAR PV PROJECTS

The Ministry of Power (MoP) has released the guidelines for procurement of power from grid connected solar PV power projects. The guidelines are applicable to solar PV projects of size 5 MW and above. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide a direction for proper electricity procurement by distribution licensees and to protect the interest of the consumers. Also to make this process transparent and uniform.

 

Following are the salient features of the guidelines:

 

  • The appropriate Commission shall be CERC only in case if the distribution licensee is located in more than one state

  • SERCs will be the appropriate commission in case if there is a single distribution licensee.

  • The conditions to be met by the procurer are as follows:

  • The bid document should be prepared in accordance with the guidelines of MoP and the Standard Bidding Documents.

  • Clearances need to be procured from the end procurer, the agency developing the solar park.

  • Procurer has to specify where the project has been set up.

  • The bid structure shall be as follows:

  • The bids will be designed in terms of packages where the minimum will be 50 MW and the bids may be in energy quantity or power capacity terms.

  • The procurer may opt for either ‘tariff as bidding parameter’ or ‘VGF as the bidding parameter’.

  • The PPA period should not be less than 25 years and it can be in terms of energy or power. Repowering will be allowed from time to time for the duration of the PPA.

  • In case of default by the power generator, it shall be liable to pay the solar power generator as written in the PPA. Also, in such a case, the lender shall be allowed to exercise their right to substitution as per the substitution agreement provided in the PPA.

  • In case if the procurer is at default, it shall give its part of the PPA to a third party in the given time. In case if that is not done, the solar generators have a choice to terminate the PPA.

  • Once the procurer calls for bids, a single stage bidding process shall be followed. The procurer can also chose if an e-reverse auction shall be held. It is the responsibility of the procurer to give the details of the bidding process in case of a Solar park specific project.

  • For bid submission and evaluation, the bidders may form a consortium and chose a leader who shall be the focal point of contact. Also, for evaluation of bids, the procurer may form a committee. The technical and price bids shall be submitted separately along with a bid guarantee. Minimum number of bidders should be two and a proper methodology shall be followed for bid evaluation.

  • A 30 day period shall be given for bid submission from the issuance of RfS document. A table containing the time table for bid process is given in the guidelines attached below.

  • Bank guarantees such as earnest money deposit and performance bank guarantee need to be submitted.

The guidelines can be accessed here.

TNERC NOTIFIES SOLAR TARIFF FOR FY 2017-18

 Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission, in its latest order dated 28th March, 2017, has released the tariff values for solar projects in the state.

The tariff values are given as follows:

There has been a slight decrease in tariff for both solar PV and solar thermal this year as compared to the last FY. A comparison of the same is given as follows:

 

The order can be accessed here

SOLAR CAPACITY SET TO CROSS 20 GW IN THE NEXT 15 MONTHS, SAYS PIYUSH GOYAL:

As per Mr Piyush Goyal, India’s installed solar capacity is going to cross the 20 GW mark from the current 19 GW capacity by 2020. The reason for this estimated increase has been attributed to the fact that Make in India is no more in its nascent stage. Now, India can support majority of its financial and technological needs for increasing its renewable energy capacity. The proof of the same is the drastic reduction in the cost of solar power to an extent that it is comparable to the cost of thermal power. India’s capacity increased four times since the past 3 years when it reached the 10 GW mark in March this year. In May 2014, the capacity was 2,650 MW. The same has been covered in our previous blog.

The Deccan Chronicle article can be accessed here.

INDIA’S SOLAR CAPACITY CROSSES 10 GW:

As per the article in DNA India, the New and Renewable Energy Minister, Piyush Goyal, declared that India has crossed 10,000 MW of solar energy on the 12th of this month and has increased more than three times in the last three years. This milestone coincided with the commissioning of 45 MW solar power project in Rajasthan by National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC).

This is in concurrence with the proposed goal that India has of installing 100 GW of solar capacity 2022 and its renewable energy capacity to 175 GW.

Telangana Regulations for connectivity with the Grid and sale of electricity from the Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic

Telangana recently came up with its net metering regulation for connectivity with the Grid and sale of electricity from the Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic. This Regulation will be applicable to the distribution licensee, an eligible consumer and a third party owner of a Roof Top Solar PV System in the state of Telangana.

 

Following are some of the highlights of the regulations:

 

  • An eligible consumer shall install the grid connected Rooftop Solar PV System of the rated capacity as specified in this Regulation.
  • The tariff payable to an eligible consumer under the net-metering shall be the average power purchase cost of a Distribution Licensee.
  • The net metering facility, as far as possible, of an eligible consumer shall be in three phase service.
  • A single phase consumer is also eligible for net metering up to 3 KW.
  • The capacity of a Rooftop Solar PV System to be installed at the premises of an eligible consumer shall not be less than one Kilo Watt peak (1kWp) and a maximum of One (1) MWp.
  • The quantum of electricity consumed by an Eligible Consumer from the Rooftop Solar PV System under the Net Metering Arrangement shall qualify towards his compliance of Solar RPPO, if such Consumer is an Obligated Entity.
  • The quantum of electricity consumed by the Eligible Consumer from the Rooftop Solar PV System under the Net Metering arrangement shall, if such Consumer is not an Obligated Entity, qualify towards meeting the Solar RPPO of the Distribution Licensee.
  • The unadjusted surplus Units of the solar energy purchased by the Distribution Licensee under the provisions of sub-Para 10.3 shall qualify towards meeting its Solar RPPO.
  • The Rooftop Solar PV System under the net metering arrangement, whether self- owned or third party owned installed on the Eligible Consumer’s premises, shall be exempted from Transmission Charge, Transmission Loss, Wheeling Charge, Wheeling Loss, Cross Subsidy Surcharge and Additional Surcharge.
  • The Rooftop Solar PV System Developer shall retain the entire proceeds of CDM benefits in the first year after the date of commercial operation of the generating station.

 

The regulation can be accessed here.

RERC Draft Solar Tariff Policy for FY 2016-17

Rajasthan Electricity Regulatory Commission (RERC) recently  proposed a levelized tariff under a draft regulation (RERC Terms & Conditions for Determination of Tariff for Renewable Energy Sources Regulations, 2016) issued for Solar power generators of the state.

The graph below depicts the change in the tariff from the past year:

 

RERC has invited the comments and suggestions by 13th September 2016 on the same. The tariff proposed for FY 16-17 is much lower than the tariff of previous year in case of both Solar PV and Rooftop Solar PV, It can be said that the reason behind the reduction in the tariff of Solar PV is because of decreasing prices of Solar PV cells.

The regulation can be accessed here.

 

MPERC Determines Tariffs for Solar Power Projects

Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission recently released its tariff order for energy procured from solar power based projects for the control period from 31st March 2016 to 31st 2019. The tariff determined by the Commission in this will be applicable to the following Projects located in the State of Madhya Pradesh and selling electricity to the distribution licensees within Madhya Pradesh only:-

(a) Solar PV Power Plants

(b) Solar Thermal Power Plants

The Commission came out; vide its proposal for categorization of solar PV and thermal projects as well as for fixing the norms for technological specific parameters.

The Commission has fixed the normative capital costs inclusive of all components as well as taxes etc. for solar thermal and solar PV projects by keeping in line with the CERC benchmark capital cost of Rs. 12 Crore and 5.3crores per MW for 2016-17. The graphs below gives a comparison of the Capital cost and levelized tariff from the previous control period:

 

The MPERC Regulation can be accessed here.

The MPERC Previous tariff Order can be accessed here.

 

RERC Draft Solar Tariff Policy for FY 2016-17

Rajasthan Electricity Regulatory Commission(RERC) recently  proposed a levelized tariff under a draft regulation (RERC Terms & Conditions for Determination of Tariff for Renewable Energy Sources Regulations, 2016) issued for Solar power generators of the state. The brief summary of the proposed draft is as below:

The graph below depicts the change in the tariff from the past year:

RERC has invited the comments and suggestions by 13th September 2016 on the same. The tariff proposed for FY 16-17 is much lower than the tariff of previous year in case of both Solar PV and Rooftop Solar PV, and in case of Solar Thermal Power Plants. It can be said that the reason behind the reduction in the tariff of Solar PV is because of decreasing prices of Solar PV cells and overall project execution cost.

The regulation can be accessed here.

HPERC Determines Generalized Levelised Tariff for Solar PV for FY 2016-17

HPERC recently determined its generalized levelized tariff for Solar PV for FY 2016-17. The Commission came out; vide its proposal for categorization of solar PV projects as well as for fixing the norms for technological specific parameters, other terms and conditions and determination of generic levelized tariffs for solar PV projects up to 5.00 MW capacities.

The Commission has fixed the normative capital costs inclusive of all components as well as taxes etc. for solar PV projects up to 5.00 MW capacity by increasing the CERC benchmark capital cost of Rs. 530.02 Lakhs per MW by 7.50% up to 1 MW and 6% above 1 MW and up to 5.00 MW capacity plants for 2016-17, as given below:-

 

The Commission has thereby determined the generic levelized tariffs and the associated terms and conditions for Solar PV power plant in respect of  FY 2016-17 as given under:-

 

These tariffs will be applicable for the solar PV projects where PPAs are signed on or before 31st March 2017, after approval of the Commission and the projects are commissioned on or before 31st March, 2018.

 

The regulation can be accessed  here.

Telangana Regulations for connectivity with the Grid and sale of electricity from the Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic

Telangana recently came up with its net metering regulation for connectivity with the Grid and sale of electricity from the Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic. This Regulation will be applicable to the distribution licensee, an eligible consumer and a third party owner of a Roof Top Solar PV System in the state of Telangana.

 

Following are some of the highlights of the regulations:

 

  • An eligible consumer shall install the grid connected Rooftop Solar PV System of the rated capacity as specified in this Regulation.
  • The tariff payable to an eligible consumer under the net-metering shall be the average power purchase cost of a Distribution Licensee.
  • The net metering facility, as far as possible, of an eligible consumer shall be in three phase service.
  • A single phase consumer is also eligible for net metering up to 3 KW.
  • The capacity of a Rooftop Solar PV System to be installed at the premises of an eligible consumer shall not be less than one Kilo Watt peak (1kWp) and a maximum of One (1) MWp.
  • The quantum of electricity consumed by an Eligible Consumer from the Rooftop Solar PV System under the Net Metering Arrangement shall qualify towards his compliance of Solar RPPO, if such Consumer is an Obligated Entity.
  • The quantum of electricity consumed by the Eligible Consumer from the Rooftop Solar PV System under the Net Metering arrangement shall, if such Consumer is not an Obligated Entity, qualify towards meeting the Solar RPPO of the Distribution Licensee.
  • The unadjusted surplus Units of the solar energy purchased by the Distribution Licensee under the provisions of sub-Para 10.3 shall qualify towards meeting its Solar RPPO.
  • The Rooftop Solar PV System under the net metering arrangement, whether self- owned or third party owned installed on the Eligible Consumer’s premises, shall be exempted from Transmission Charge, Transmission Loss, Wheeling Charge, Wheeling Loss, Cross Subsidy Surcharge and Additional Surcharge.
  • The Rooftop Solar PV System Developer shall retain the entire proceeds of CDM benefits in the first year after the date of commercial operation of the generating station.

 

The regulation can be accessed here.

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