KERC DETERMINES RETAIL TARIFF FOR STATE

Karnataka Electricity Regulatory Commission in its order dated 11th April, 2017, has approved the retail supply tariff for 2017-18. The tariff hike proposed by the KERC for industrial and commercial consumers and a comparison of the existing and the new tariff proposed by the commission can be seen as follows:

 

 

The table below represents the cross subsidy charges worked out as per the different consumer category:

 

The order can be accessed here.

REC TRADE RESULTS APRIL 2017

Being the first trade session of the financial year 2017-18, the April trade session was a robust one. Total Non-solar demand was 5.37 lakhs (vs 8.8 L demand in March), and clearing ratios on IEX and PXIL were 4.56% and 4.4% respectively.

Total solar demand was 2.08 lakhs, and the clearing ratio in IEX and PXIL were 2.53% and 8.76% respectively (March 2017 demand was 1.43 lakhs).

 

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 4.56% and 4.4% in both IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 2.53% and 8.76% in IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

HIMACHAL PRADESH ELECTRICITY REGULATORY COMMISSION (RENEWABLE POWER PURCHASE OBLIGATION AND ITS COMPLIANCE) REGULATION

HPERC has notified Renewable Purchase Obligation and its compliance, 3rd amendment 2017 on 24th March 2017.

 

Quantum of Renewable Power Purchase Obligation (RPPO)

 

Since Himachal Pradesh mostly thrives on the energy produced through Hydropower, the state will be a beneficiary since RPO is excluded from RPO obligation as per the regulation.

The graph below shows the total and type of energy consumption by the state of Himachal Pradesh. The data has been derived from CEA Report.

 

Almost 3/4th energy of the total consumption comes from the Hydro Power. Its an added advantage for the state that RPO is exempted from the power consumed through Hydro sources, thus this in turn will reduce the cost of power from the state.

The graph below gives a comparison between the MoP recent RPO Trajectory and HPERC’s earlier RPO Trajectory:

HPERC for computing Renewable purchase obligation for a year of obligated has included  the transmission and distribution losses within the state in the following manner:

  • In case the electricity is purchased by such obligated entity from sources outside state , the electricity at state periphery shall be considered as the consumption of obligated entity

  • In case the electricity is purchased or generated from generating sources located within the state the electricity injected at the generating bus bar shall be considered as its consumption

The above given clauses are against the law of Electricity Act 2003 as for computing renewable purchase obligation total consumption has to taken under consideration excluding the transmission and distribution losses.

The Supreme Court order on RPO dated 13th May 2015 has taken into consideration the word “ Total Consumption” which also has been used in Electricity Act 2003. One can find below the reference from the act Section 86 (e):

promote cogeneration and generation of electricity from renewable sources of energy by providing suitable measures for connectivity with the grid and sale of electricity to any person, and also specify, for purchase of electricity from such sources, a percentage of the total consumption of electricity in the area of a distribution licence;

 The regulation can be accessed here.

SOLAR TARIFF PRICES HIT A NEW LOW:

The solar tariff prices have hit a new low of Rs 3.15 per unit in an auction on Wednesday . The previous low in tariff was Rs 3.30 per unit in an auction which took place in the month of February.

 Source: Livemint (Dated: 13 Apr 2017)
In an article by Livemint, Mercom Capital Group has the following observations: This decrease in tariffs is causing the states to rethink and they are demanding a new power purchase agreement (PPA). This is causing the process of tendering and auctioning to slow down. An example of a state where such a thing has happened is Jharkhand. It is yet to sign its PPA for the 1000 MW solar capacity it had auctioned last year. The reason behind this is the subdued demand and poor financial condition of the discoms. The discoms which had signed their PPAs at a higher tariff are now going to find them unpalatable as they would lean towards cheaper tariff. Therefore, projects locked at higher tariffs will face delays in payments or power offtake curtailments. This might not only affect renewable energy power but also have an impact on renewable energy contracts.

APERC RELEASES RETAIL TARIFF ORDER FOR FY 2017-18:

The Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission has released an order dated 31st March, 2017 regarding the Tariff for Retail Sale of Electricity during 2017-18.

 

The below table gives the comparison between the new tariff determined from FY 2017-18 and FY 2016-17 and % change in the tariff from  FY 2016-17 and FY 2017-18 for different categories:

 

Wheeling Charges:

The tariff included the wheeling charges for FY 2017-18 and they are given as follows:


No information about wheeling loss has been given in this order.

 

Cross Subsidy Surcharge:

The Cross Subsidy Surcharge (CSS) for FY 2017-18 has been given below for different categories:

The regulation can be accessed here

MPERC RELEASES TARIFF ORDER FOR LV, HV AND EHV CONSUMERS:

Madhya Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (MPERC) in its order dated 1st April 2016 has determined the tariff for Low Voltage (LV), High Voltage (HV) and Extra High Voltage (EHV). A summary of the tariff for HV3 consumers which includes Industrial, Non-industrial and Shopping Malls has been given in the table below:

The order can be accessed here

REC TRADE RESULTS MARCH 2017:

March trading results were far better than anticipated considering the recent CERC order on revised floor and forbearance prices. The March trade session remained a robust one. Total Non-solar demand was 8.88 lakhs (vs 10.4 L demand in February), and clearing ratios on IEX and PXIL were 6.11% and 9.6% respectively. For the full year FY 16-17, total RECs sold were 59.3 lakh as compared to 43 lakhs last year – an increase of almost 37.7%. This was the last trading session of FY 16-17.

 

Total solar demand was 1.43 lakhs, and the clearing ratio in IEX and PXIL were 2.90% and 2.74% respectively (Feb 2017 demand was 49,544). For the full year FY 16-17, total RECs sold were 5.5 lakh as compared to 6.4 lakhs last year – a decrease of almost 14.06%.

Non Solar – The clearing ratio stood at 6.11% and 9.6% in both IEX and PXIL respectively.

Solar – Clearing ratio stood at 2.90% and 2.74% in IEX and PXIL respectively.

 

NEW FORBEARANCE AND FLOOR PRICE FOR REC FRAMEWORK:

Summary:

  • The Honorable CERC published the final order on revised price bands for RECs which will be valid from April 1, 2017 onwards.

  • The new floor and forbearance prices are given below

 

  • This represents a drastic reduction of 71% for Solar RECs, and 33% for non-solar RECs

  • Existing inventory of RECs will not be given vintage multiplier

  • RECs that were at the verge of expiry have been given an extension
Impact on the market:

Immediate impact:

  • Overall, existing RECs projects will take a loss of Rs 1,866 crore due to reduction in the value of existing REC inventory. This represents roughly 50% of the total value of RECs. With such a significant loss, it is likely that several projects will become NPAs.

  • Reduced trading in March 31 trade session – generally, the March trading session sees high trading volumes as it is the last trading session of the compliance period. However, with the prospect of significant saving by trading in April, many obligated entities are likely to postpone trading to the next month.

Infact, this has been acknowledged and even allowed by a state regulator. See relevant order for allowing postponing of trading to an obligated entity here – http://www.mercindia.org.in/pdf/Order%2058%2042/DO-35%20of%202017-16032017.pdf

 

Long-term impact:

  • Potential (marginal) higher demand going forward – RECs prices have come down to such an extent that most captive and open access based consumers are likely to find buying RECs cheaper way of meeting RPO than buying green power. This may also apply in the case of several Discom’s, particularly in states that are power surplus. These low prices may therefore result in increase in demand of RECs.

However, it must be kept in mind that REC price reduction is always beneficial to the Obligated entities which are non-compliant as they will have an option to purchase RECs and fulfill their RPO compliance at lower prices whereas Obligated Entities who have been regularly meeting their RPO compliance will have incurred significantly higher cost. Therefore, a regularly reducing floor price actually incentivises postponing purchase of RECs, rather than meeting RPO.

Without strict enforcement and any risk of penalty, Obligated entities still have no incentive to comply. We believe that RECs demand will increase, but only to a very limited extent, as most obligated entities still don’t face any reason to comply with RPO at all.

The previous order can be accessed here and our analysis of the same can be found here.

DETERMINATION OF FEE AND CHARGES PAYABLE UNDER REGULATION 12 OF THE CENTRAL ELECTRICITY REGULATORY COMMISSION (TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR DEALING IN ENERGY SAVINGS CERTIFICATES) REGULATIONS, 2016:

In a recent order dated 24.03.2017, the apex electricity regulator CERC has finalised the fees and charges payable by the Designated consumers to the registry for the purpose of meeting the cost and expenses towards the management of registry and software platform.


The fees and charges determined through this order may be applicable upto Financial Year 2019-20  or as may be determined by the CERC in consultation with Registry and the Administrator


The Fees & charges applicable are tabled below:

 

With this, the only thing remaining to be approved are the exchange rules and charges for trading. Once that is done, all the procedural aspects to enable ESCerts trading will be completed. We expect trading to start sometime in the second half of April.


The link to the order can be found here.

FOR THE FIRST TIME, INDIA BECOMES A NET EXPORTER OF ELECTRICITY, SAYS POWER MINISTRY:

As per an article in the Times of India, the power ministry on 29th March, 2017 declared that India has now become a net exporter of power. Power export of about 5,498 million units was seen from April ’16 – February ’17 and this value was 4% higher than the power India imported from Bhutan. New electricity lines to neighboring countries such as Nepal, Myanmar and Bangladesh will only aid in the sale of electricity from the country.

This is an interesting prospect for India since it has always been a power deficit country. Though there are many villages as mentioned in the  Economic Times article within India which do not receive electricity all day round, India has been able to gain the status of being a net exporter. This is mostly because of the poor financial health of DISCOMS in the country.

 

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